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    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

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Coupeville’s Big Rock in the news

Big Rock. Island County Commissioner Angie Homola and her daughter Kira. Angie says she is 5 ft tall, so the erratic is about 22' (6.7 m) tall. 2010 photo by Dave Tucker.

Big Rock in the 1960s. Photo courtesy of Donn Charnley.

The big rounded erratic in Coupeville has recently been the subject of debate. The town council considered a proposal to purchase the land the erratic sits on to protect the rock from possible destruction. Their was concern that the owner of the apartments behind (to the west) of the rock would consider ‘removing’ the boulder to make room for a new and larger apartment complex. Here is the story in the Whidbey News Times. An earlier article in the paper, including information from UW glacial geologist Terry Swanson, describes the rock and the property ownership issue. The second article also reveals that at least as late as the 1930s, a stairway allowed access to the rock’s summit. Note that the newspaper refers to the big hunk o’ greenstone as ‘granite’, though a much earlier story in a rival newspaper (South Whidbey Record), identified the rock correctly in an article about erratics featuring Terry Swanson.

The Wedgwood erratic is on a lot cared for by the neighborhood.

Thanks to Valarie Bunn of Seattle’s Wedgwood neighborhood for supplying these links. She wrote about the similar Wedgwood erratic in her Wedgwood history blog.

Blowers Bluff geologic field trip added

A geological field trip to the fabulous glacial and interglacial deposits at Blowers Bluff on Whidbey Island is now up. You can find it at

https://nwgeology.wordpress.com/the-fieldtrips/whidbey-island-glacial-deposits/blowers-bluff-whidbey-island/

The field trip will be found by going to “The Field Trips”, then “Pleistocene Glacial Stratigraphy on Whidbey Island”, then the trip. YOu can also find the earlier trip to Useless Bay and Double Bluff there.