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  • MOUNT BAKER: Eruptive history, hazards, research.

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    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.
    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

    EDUCATORS: Please feel free to use anything you find here that is useful to your mission educating people about Earth science. E-mail me if it would help to have a larger or higher-resolution version of any of the images. tuckerd at geol dot wwu dot edu

Geology of the Rock Trail, Larrabee State Park

Tafoni Wall, striped by tree shadows, is a highlight of the Rock Trail.

Tafoni Wall, striped by tree shadows, is a highlight of the Rock Trail.

I have posted a geology guide to Larrabee State Park’s new Rock Trail. Read the full guide here on the Northwest Geology Field Trips website. The out-and-back hike is just short of 2 miles, and the cliff exposures are perhaps the best in the Chuckanuts. The trail, built by prodigious efforts of over 100 volunteers, was profiled in the Bellingham Herald in February.

 

Red line marks the new Rock Trail. Contour interval is 20'. Note scale in lower left.

Red line marks the new Rock Trail. Contour interval is 20′. Note scale in lower left.

Fidalgo ophiolite field trip, Part II- Mount Erie

Gabbro at Stop 1. Note the pale vertical dikes near the yellow hammer. Click any image to enlarge.

Gabbro at Stop 1. Note the pale vertical dikes near the yellow hammer. Click any image to enlarge.

A self-guided geology field trip to the second part of the Fidalgo ophiolite (oceanic crust section) is posted here. This field trip visits intrusive and sedimentary rocks on Fidalgo Island, including Mount Erie. This is the second installment in the ophiolite series, which started at the chunk of the mantle at Washington Park.

The April 12th guided geology field trip sponsored by Mount Baker Volcano Research Center will visit some of these rocks. Registration information is on the MBVRC website. If you have been waffling, time to be decisive- the trip is nearly full!

The view south from Stop 2 at Mount Erie.

The view south from Stop 2 at Mount Erie. Here we see an island in Lake Campbell, on Fidalgo Island. Skagit Bay stretches off to the south.

Nooksack River landslide near Deming: An update

My friend Dan McShane visited the Nooksack shore immediately across from the Clay Banks landslide toe Saturday and posted a great set of photos on his Washington Landscapes blog, as well as further analysis of the changes to the river channel at the Clay Banks in the past years. Click this to read his report. Dan visited a different area than I did, and his report is well worth reading. His newest photos of the landslide deposit are toward the bottom of the post. Among his observations are blocks of clay across the river from the failing hillside of the Clay Banks. One of his photos is below, showing the landslide toe where the river has cut through it.

‘Mounds’ between Sedro Woolley and Burlington

Hello Dave,
I’ve always wondered about the large “mounds”/irregularities to the East of I-5 between the Skagit and Samish rivers… They’re pretty hard to miss. How did they form, and what exactly are they?

Carston, May 29, 2013

Burlington Hill looking south from Cook Road. Click to enlarge any image.

Burlington Hill looking south from Cook Road. Click to enlarge any image.

In response to Carston,  my geologist friend Doug McKeever and I finally got around to making the jaunt south to look at these conspicuous wooded hills that rise out of the Skagit River flood plain. The greenschist and phyllite is quite interesting and very easy to get to. The driving trip is a worthwhile short detour of just a few miles when you are passing by on I-5. On a nice day the view from one of the hills over the flats is wonderful. The field trip is posted here.

Silvery phyllite and greenschist.

Silvery phyllite and greenschist on Burltingon Hill.

Geology Underfoot: BOOK SENT TO PUBLISHER!

DT and the Geology Underfoot in Western Washington files. You will get to read it on paper, soemthing I've yet to see.

DT and the Geology Underfoot in Western Washington files- all on one flimsy bit of plastic. You will get to read it on paper, something I’ve yet to see. Chico stands guard my monitor. Photo by Kim Brown.

I finally completed the manuscript of Geology Underfoot in Western Washington. The sum of the last three years of my life was copied onto a DVD and sent off to the publisher today – 423 files including chapter text, photos, diagrams, and maps. There are (at this point) 22 self-guiding field trips, plus a lengthy Introduction that is a primer on plate tectonics, a capsule history of the geologic history of western Washington, a bit about petrology, and how to date a rock (“You need to be a little boulder” says Kim.) Groan. I promise I do not use that pun in the book, but there may be a few other gneiss ones. (Sorry). OK, now my editor James Lainsbury at Mountain Press Publishers gets to hack away. He’ll send it back to me for what I’m sure will be shortening, revisions to some of the figures I made, and who knows what else. The book will be on bookshelves in 2014 unless James says ‘This sucks. Start over.’ Thanks to all the people, geologists and ‘civilians’ alike, who read and field checked the chapters.

You can read a sample chapter (pre-editing) and learn more about the book here on my website.

So, time for a beer. Well, maybe a nap first.

Dave