Snohomish and Tacoma Geology Underfoot Book talks

A reminder that I will be in Snohomish this Saturday, Feb. 20, and in Tacoma next Thursday, Feb. 25, to talk about Geology Underfoot in Western Washington.

SNOHOMISH Saturday February 20th, 2 PM, Sno-Isle Public Library, 311 Maple Ave., Snohomish, WA

TACOMA Thursday February 25 Kings Book Store, 218 St Helens Ave Tacoma, WA. 7 PM http://www.kingsbookstore.com/event/2016-02

 

Geology Underfoot in Western Washington- order copies from your bookstore.

Dear friends,

Geology Underfoot in Western Washington should be available in late April or early May. Order copies from your favorite bookstore now. You have the title; the ISBN is 978-0-87842-640-9. It is being published by Mountain Press Publishing. The store won’t have heard of it yet. Get the word to the store now and they will place their orders with the publisher or with their distributors.

Cover art by Eric Knight

Cover art by Eric Knight

Two presentations are scheduled:

May 12th, 7 PM, Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, sponsored by Village Books and the Museum.

May 13th, University Bookstore [Seattle’s U-District] at 7.

I will be signing copies at each of these talks.

Feel free to ask a bookstore or group to sponsor a presentation. They can contact me via my email:

email address to send reports and photos. I'll credit you.

email address.

Cover art for Geology Underfoot in Western Washington

GUWW cover. Painting by Eric Knight.

Geology Underfoot in Western Washington cover art. Painting by Eric Knight. Click for full size image file.

Geology Underfoot in Western Washington has gone to the printers, and should be on store shelves the end of April or early May. Start bugging you local bookstore to get orders in now. Here’s the book’s cover. It is an oblique view of Mount Rainier during a moderate eruption, made by Eric Knight, and is modeled in part on the 500-year-old Electron lahar. Eric painted the bird’s-eye-view in an arc looking from the north  to the southeast, from the Tacoma Tideflats around to the erupting volcano. There is a lot of detail. Look closely and you will see lahars descending the northwest and western flanks into the Mowich and Puyallup River valleys. The boiling cloud of a pyroclastic flow is on the right, covering the Tahoma Glacier. The lahars coalesce and inundate the Puyallup valley. That’s Lake Kapowsin at lower right. A short distance downstream from the lake, the lahar passes through the center of Orting, which appears seriously damaged and on toward Puyallup and Tacoma. The lahar would likely have a much reduced sediment load by this point, and be more of a hyperconcentrated flow- predominantly extremely muddy water rather than a dense slug of mud. The muddy flow enters Puget Sound at Commencement Bay, having sloshed mud and water all over the Tacoma tideflats industrial area. Suspended sediment has discolored Puget Sound most of the way to Elliot Bay at Seattle. There’s not enough detail in this image to tell, but I-5 appears intact where it crosses the Puyallup. In this hypothetical eruption, no lahar has entered the White River valley so the Auburn-Kent-Duwamish area has been spared.

ERic Knight's art showing a glacier-filled Yosemite Valley on the cover of Geology Underfoot in Yosemite National Park by Allen Glazner and Greg Stock.

ERic Knight’s art showing a glacier-filled Yosemite Valley on the cover of Geology Underfoot in Yosemite National Park by Allen Glazner and Greg Stock.

Erik also did the cover art for Geology Underfoot in Yosemite National Park. He makes wonderful panoramic maps. Visit his website to see a fine panoramic painting of the Salish Sea. It is interactive, so you can zoom in, pan very different perspectives. The tool bar at the bottom includes a ‘help’ button for instructions.

Guided geology field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone

The NCI field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone is booked up.

MBVRC WILL OFFER A VERSION OF THIS TRIP LATER IN THE SUMMER. PLEASE STAY TUNED to the MBVRC blog: mbvrc.wordpress.com.

Dave Tucker

Mount Baker Volcano Research Center subscription website

The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge. The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge.

North Cascades Institute is offering a guided geology field trip to the 9500-year-old Schreibers Meadow cinder cone on the south flank of Mount Baker. The trip will be led by MBVRC’s Dave Tucker. The date is July 6th, and costs $95. Register at the NCI website:

http://ncascades.org/signup/programs/volcanoes-legacy-in-cinder-cones-and-crater-lakes

The Schreibers cone is the only one in the Mount Baker volcanic field. It is located in old growth forest at 3500 feet elevation in Schreibers Meadow, just 1/2 mile from the end of the road. The trip will walk a short distance along the Park Butte/Railroad Grade trail, then veer off cross country (huckleberry meadow and some ponds) before the final 130′ climb up a steep forested slope to the crater rim. We’ll walk down to the soggy shores of the two crater lakes, and up to the opposite rim. After…

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Guided geology trip to Ptarmigan Ridge, Mount Baker

Mount Baker and Rainbow Glacier from Ptarmigan Glacier.

Mount Baker and Rainbow Glacier from Ptarmigan Glacier.

There are three spaces left on North Cascade Institute’s guided geology hike [led by yours truly] to the volcanic wonders along the Ptarmigan Ridge trail. This traverses the high country between Mount Baker and Artist’s Point at the end of the Baker Highway.

Sunday, September 29 Rendezvous in Glacier at 8 AM. An all day hike, about 6 miles round trip, 500′ elevation gain/loss. $95 includes bus from Glacier.

Sign up info here:

http://ncascades.org/signup/programs/mount-baker-the-story-of-volcanoes-ii-ph

Here’s the NCI blurb:

Experience time travel by foot on the Ptarmigan Ridge trail in Mount Baker’s radiant late-summer high country. Our field excursion will begin above tree line at Artist’s Point at the end of the Mount Baker Highway before venturing out toward the simmering, glaciated volcano herself. Along the way, we’ll travel over ancient records of volcanism as we traverse the 1-million-year-old Kulshan caldera, a giant volcano that erupted cataclysmically through a continental ice sheet long before Mount Baker built itself from stacks of lava.

As we hike past lava domes that erupted shortly after the caldera collapsed, we’ll lay hands on much younger columnar andesite that still predates Mount Baker, discuss the origin of the eroded table at Table Mountain, and examine layers of volcanic ash preserved in the soil, including the famous Mount Mazama/Crater Lake layer.

Dave is a leading geological expert on the Mount Baker region and will share his intimate knowledge of the natural and cultural history of the area. He’ll interpret the story of this landscape as evidenced in its rocks and ash.

Sign up for geology trip- Ptarmigan Ridge, Mount Baker

We'll learn how platey jointing and columnar jointing forms.

We’ll learn how platy jointing and columnar jointing form.

The view west from the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail.

The view west from the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail.

Dave Tucker will lead a one-day geology hike on Ptarmigan Ridge, near the Mount Baker Ski Area. The trip is organized by North Cascades Institute.

September 29, all day. $95 includes trip guide and transport from Glacier Ranger Station.

This hike will explore the gorgeous volcanic landscape on the east side of Mount Baker- Kulshan caldera ash flow tuff, post-caldera rhyolite domes, Table Mountain and Ptarmigan Ridge lava flows, volcanic ash deposits (Baker and Crater Lake). Mount Shuksan is just east of us, so we can also discuss terrane accretion. The hike is above tree line on the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail, elevation gain is around 500 feet, total round trip distance of 10 miles but probably less. There are 6 spaces left for this trip. The September 28 trip is full.

NCI website for the trip: http://ncascades.org/signup/programs/mount-baker-the-story-of-volcanoes-ii-ph

Registration: http://ncascades.org/signup/programs/mount-baker-the-story-of-volcanoes-ii-ph/program-registration

Questions? Contact NCI, or Dave Tucker directly.

email address to send reports and photos. I'll credit you.

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Guided geology field trip by Dave Tucker: Baker River trail June 8th

Dear friends,

An alluvial fan is perfectly exposed in cross section along the Baker River trail.

An alluvial fan is perfectly exposed in cross-section along the Baker River trail.

Mount Baker Volcano Research Center is offering a field trip up the Baker River on June 8th. It is a fundraiser for the non-profit, and I’ll be leading it, along with Doug McKeever (Whatcom Community College) and Sue Madsen (Skagit Fisheries Enhancement).

Highlights include:

  • Shuksan greenschist (metamorphosed subducted seafloor basalt) which is the local bedrock;
  • new salmon restoration facilities;
  • an active alluvial fan;
  • river erosion and deposition;
  • a great variety of rocks in river bars;
  • rock slides;
  • a fantastic ‘faerie forest’ of lichen-draped maples.
  • If the weather be good- fabulous views into the heart of the North Cascades.

Cost is $75, includes van transport and a trip guide.

For info and registration, go to:

http://mbvrc.wordpress.com/2013/05/08/mbvrc-geology-field-trip-june-8th-geo-potpourri-plus-salmon-ecology/

An unnamed waterfall plummets hundreds of feet over a wall of metamorphic bedrock along the trail. Click to enlarge any photo.

An unnamed waterfall plummets hundreds of feet over a wall of metamorphic bedrock along the trail. Click to enlarge any photo.

Geology field trips offered by North Cascades Institute

I will be leading three field courses on behalf of North Cascades Institute in late summer of 2013.Also, my friend David Williams will lead an urban geology tour in Seattle.

Migmatite in the Diablo Overlook road cut? What's 'maigmatite'? Sign up to find out!

Migmatite in the Diablo Overlook road cut. What’s ‘migmatite’? Sign up to find out!

August 9-11: GEOLOGY OF THE NORTH CASCADES: CROSS SECTION THROUGH THE CRUST. This course will be based out of the NCI Environmental Learning Center at Diablo Lake. Over three days we will examine different sites along Highway 20 from Sedro Woolley to Washington Pass. Meals and lodging at the Learning Center.

Kuslhan caldera, Mount Baker, and Table Mountain volcanics can all be examined along the Ptarmigan Trail.

Kulshan caldera, Mount Baker, and Table Mountain volcanics can all be examined along the Ptarmigan Trail.

September 28 and repeated on September 29: MOUNT BAKER: THE STORY OF VOLCANOES I AND II. I will lead a one day hike along Ptarmigan Ridge on the east flank of Mount Baker.We will look at volcanic deposits from the Kulshan caldera, pre-Mount Baker andesite volcanoes, and young Baker itself. These two hikes will fill up VERY QUICKLY so register right now if you are interested.

In downtown Seattle, see 3.5 billion year old Morton gneiss, probably the oldest building stone in the world!

In downtown Seattle, see 3.5 billion year old Morton gneiss, probably the oldest building stone in the world!

Also on September 28, David Williams leads ‘Street Smart Naturalist’. This will be a walking tour of downtown geology. highly regarded and a must for Seattle residents interested in geology.

Registration and descriptions for all these programs begins at the NCI geology webpage.

Diatryma paper is published

By Dave Tucker November 15, 2012

The giant bird foot track as originally found in the Racehorse Creek landslide. Click to enlarge.

A journal paper about the giant Chuckanut bird tracks attributed to Diatryma giganteus has been published. The authors are George Mustoe, Dave Tucker and Keith Kemplin (George and Keith are the codiscoverers of the tracks). The paper is published in the journal Palaeontology. This enlightened journal allows dissemination of papers via the internet, rather than requiring purchase. So, I am pleased to attach the pdf in this post. It will also be attached to the main page about the giant foot prints. It describes the fossil tracks, why we believe they were made by the giant flightless bird Diatryma, what the tracks tell us about the lifestyle of the big bird, and why we assigned the name Rivavipes giganteus to the tracks. The paper should be readable to about everyone, as specialized terminology is kept to a minimum other than references to the anatomical parts. Click this link to open the research paper pdf file:      Giant Eocene Bird Footprints paper, Palaeontology

Guided Geology Field Trip: Scott Paul Trail, Mount Baker, August 28.

Mount Baker Volcano Research Center announces a guided geology field trip on the Scott Paul Trail, guided by Dave Tucker (WWU-MBVRC) and Doug McKeever (WCC-MBVRC).

Tuesday, August 28, all day.

7.5 miles, 2000′ elevation gain.

Cost is $75 donation to MBVRC’s nonprofit research and education fund.

Soil profile along Scott Paul Trail: Schreibers Meadow cinder cone scoria, and volcanic ash from Crater Lake caldera and Mount Baker. Click to enlarge.

The trip visits volcanic and glacial deposits, as well as wonderful alpine scenery in the high meadows.

Full details on the MBVRC blog: http://mbvrc.wordpress.com/2012/08/10/guided-geology-field-trip-scott-paul-trail-on-mount-baker/

Registration is first come, first served. Register via email:

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