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  • MOUNT BAKER: Eruptive history, hazards, research.

    Visit Mount Baker Volcano Research Center websites Main website and the blog These are no longer actively maintained but are still good references [DT, April, 2020]
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    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.
    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

    EDUCATORS: Please feel free to use anything you find here that is useful to your mission educating people about Earth science. E-mail me if it would help to have a larger or higher-resolution version of any of the images. tuckerd at geol dot wwu dot edu

New Geology hiking guide published on this website: Ridley Creek Trail, Mount Baker

Link to Ridley Creek Trail geology guide:

https://nwgeology.wordpress.com/the-fieldtrips/ridley-creek-trail-geology-guide/

Foot bridge over the Middle Fork

Foot bridge over the Middle Fork

Ridley Creek Trail begins at the end of the Middle Fork Nooksack Road on the southwest flank of Mount Baker. The trail accesses the heather meadows of Mazama Park and on to Park Butte Lookout. Along the way see forested latest Pleistocene moraines, glacial till from Canada complete with quartzite pebbles from the Rocky Mountains, limestone, lahar and ash deposits, a close up of the Cathedral Crag lava that predates Mount Baker, and finally, great views of Baker, the Black Buttes, and that enigmatic slice of the mantle, the Twin Sisters Range. Read the geology guide here.  Enjoy!

Dave Tucker

Geology Underfoot: BOOK SENT TO PUBLISHER!

DT and the Geology Underfoot in Western Washington files. You will get to read it on paper, soemthing I've yet to see.

DT and the Geology Underfoot in Western Washington files- all on one flimsy bit of plastic. You will get to read it on paper, something I’ve yet to see. Chico stands guard my monitor. Photo by Kim Brown.

I finally completed the manuscript of Geology Underfoot in Western Washington. The sum of the last three years of my life was copied onto a DVD and sent off to the publisher today – 423 files including chapter text, photos, diagrams, and maps. There are (at this point) 22 self-guiding field trips, plus a lengthy Introduction that is a primer on plate tectonics, a capsule history of the geologic history of western Washington, a bit about petrology, and how to date a rock (“You need to be a little boulder” says Kim.) Groan. I promise I do not use that pun in the book, but there may be a few other gneiss ones. (Sorry). OK, now my editor James Lainsbury at Mountain Press Publishers gets to hack away. He’ll send it back to me for what I’m sure will be shortening, revisions to some of the figures I made, and who knows what else. The book will be on bookshelves in 2014 unless James says ‘This sucks. Start over.’ Thanks to all the people, geologists and ‘civilians’ alike, who read and field checked the chapters.

You can read a sample chapter (pre-editing) and learn more about the book here on my website.

So, time for a beer. Well, maybe a nap first.

Dave