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    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

    EDUCATORS: Please feel free to use anything you find here that is useful to your mission educating people about Earth science. E-mail me if it would help to have a larger or higher-resolution version of any of the images. tuckerd at geol dot wwu dot edu

Sign up for Geology Field Trip to Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands

May 14th, 8:30-4:30

TRIP IS FULL. THERE IS A WAITING LIST. To get the earliest crack at future trips, please subscribe to MBVRC RSS posts via email- in the margin to the left.

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The view from Mount Erie, once a magma chamber below an oceanic volcano.

Mount Baker Volcano Research Center announces a guided geology field trip. This is a geologic smorgasbord, with stops near Anacortes on Fidalgo Island including ophiolite rock at Washington Park, Mount Erie’s drive-up summit, Rosario Beach and Rosario Head, and Deception Pass. Proceeding to  Whidbey Island we will visit at a minimum West Beach and an ill-sited development on the beach at Swantown.  The trip will be led by Doug McKeever, geology professor (emeritus) at Whatcom Community College, assisted by Dave Tucker, Research Associate with Western Washington University Geology Department and author of Geology Underfoot in Western Washington. Both are board members of MBVRC. COST is $75 per person (prepaid). Proceeds go to the MBVRC research fund.

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Doug McKeever and field trippers examine rock structure.

Van transportation will be provided, and a printed guide describing the most important geologic features of the stops. No hammers, please. Please bring a lunch, beverage (no alcohol please), and shoes and clothing suitable for a short beach walk and for the weather. Trip will “go” rain or shine.

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Glacially polished mantle rock at Washington Park

Credit card: please go to the MBVRC donation page and put $75 in the ‘donation amount’ at the top [please feel free to contribute more, donations are tax deductible]. Make payment to the MBVRC account using our email: research  at  mbvrc.wwu.edu You don’t need a Paypal account to do this.

Check: If you prefer to pay MBVRC directly, please send a check right away to order of MBVRC to 708 13th St, Bellingham, WA 98225. If you choose this option, please reserve via email immediately to research  at   mbvrc.wwu.edu. Will hold your spot as long as we can while your check is in transit.

This is a repeat of a trip we sponsored in spring of 2014. That trip filled very quickly so don’t delay to sign up!

 

New book: Geology of the San Juan Islands

San Juan Islands geologist Ned Brown brings us a wonderful new geology guide- just in time for holiday gifts.

Ned Brown's Geology of the San Juan Islands. Chuckanut Editions, 2014

Ned Brown’s Geology of the San Juan Islands. Chuckanut Editions, 2014

Geology of the San Juan Islands is a full color guide to the geology of these beautiful islands. The book is written for the geophile of all stripes. It is the best, easiest-to-understand explanation of San Juan geology I have seen, and I urge you to spend $19 and get your own copy right now.

Ned Brown is an emeritus professor in the Western Washington University Geology Department. He has been working in the islands for decades. The complex geology of the archipelago has long inspired and exasperated geologists. Ned’s book describes the remarkable tectonic history that has repeatedly brought together unrelated rocks from around the Pacific and stacked them against each other during subduction. His color photos and detailed diagrams explain the processes and evolution of each of the rock units clearly. The book also explains how he and others have come up with this most current interpretation of San Juan Islands geologic history, by mapping rock units and faults, dating zircon crystals in the rocks, identifying fossils and correlating these with the ancient areas where these creatures lived.  Ned tells you just where to go to see the best outcrops, including all the photo locations. Among the more amazing ideas he throws out is the possible origin of the oldest rocks in the  350- to 500-million year old Turtleback Complex on Orcas Island. The gabbro and granitic rocks, once intruded deep in the crust,  may have originally intruded deep in the crust….in northern Europe! This was during the time of the supercontinent Rodinia.

The book is self-published through the Chuckanut Editions imprint of Village Books in Bellingham. The book is not yet available. Go buy a copy in the store, or write Village Books and ask them to please make the book available for on-line orders.Dave Tucker

 

Fidalgo ophiolite field trip, Part II- Mount Erie

Gabbro at Stop 1. Note the pale vertical dikes near the yellow hammer. Click any image to enlarge.

Gabbro at Stop 1. Note the pale vertical dikes near the yellow hammer. Click any image to enlarge.

A self-guided geology field trip to the second part of the Fidalgo ophiolite (oceanic crust section) is posted here. This field trip visits intrusive and sedimentary rocks on Fidalgo Island, including Mount Erie. This is the second installment in the ophiolite series, which started at the chunk of the mantle at Washington Park.

The April 12th guided geology field trip sponsored by Mount Baker Volcano Research Center will visit some of these rocks. Registration information is on the MBVRC website. If you have been waffling, time to be decisive- the trip is nearly full!

The view south from Stop 2 at Mount Erie.

The view south from Stop 2 at Mount Erie. Here we see an island in Lake Campbell, on Fidalgo Island. Skagit Bay stretches off to the south.

A bit of the mantle: Washington Park, Fidalgo Island, Washington

The 'snake-skin' texture of serpentinite lends its name to 'ophiolite'. This is a nice example near the foot of the stairs.

The ‘snake-skin’ texture of serpentinite lends its name to ‘ophiolite’. This is a nice example near the foot of the stairs.

A geology guide to ultramafic rock at Washington Park, near Anacortes, is now available on Northwest Geology Field Trips. Click here to go straight to the field trip! The rock is the metamorphic rock serpentinite, and was originally in the earth’s mantle below oceanic crust. Exposures are found along the dramatic rocky shore and on bare rocky knobs above the coastal cliffs. A single essential outcrop is highlighted in this quick self-guided field trip. The description explains what ‘ophiolite’ is and points out spectacular glacial polish at the same outcrop.

Coming soon:

  • Mount Erie- Fidalgo ophiolite Part 2
  • Finlayson Point, Victoria
  • Rock Trail, Larrabee State Park
  • ?????

Do you have field trips to share? Please do. Let’s branch out to places in southern and eastern Washington. I’m happy to help you write your guide . Contact me via comment or email:

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