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    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.
    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

    EDUCATORS: Please feel free to use anything you find here that is useful to your mission educating people about Earth science. E-mail me if it would help to have a larger or higher-resolution version of any of the images. tuckerd at geol dot wwu dot edu

New Geology hiking guide published on this website: Ridley Creek Trail, Mount Baker

Link to Ridley Creek Trail geology guide:

https://nwgeology.wordpress.com/the-fieldtrips/ridley-creek-trail-geology-guide/

Foot bridge over the Middle Fork

Foot bridge over the Middle Fork

Ridley Creek Trail begins at the end of the Middle Fork Nooksack Road on the southwest flank of Mount Baker. The trail accesses the heather meadows of Mazama Park and on to Park Butte Lookout. Along the way see forested latest Pleistocene moraines, glacial till from Canada complete with quartzite pebbles from the Rocky Mountains, limestone, lahar and ash deposits, a close up of the Cathedral Crag lava that predates Mount Baker, and finally, great views of Baker, the Black Buttes, and that enigmatic slice of the mantle, the Twin Sisters Range. Read the geology guide here.  Enjoy!

Dave Tucker

Glacial erratic inventory website open for business

White Rock, Hood Canal. Not in the inventory yet. Many of the erratics on the Northwest Geolgoy Field trips website aren't listed (yet). Maybe that is your job!

White Rock, Hood Canal. Not in the inventory yet. Many of the erratics on the Northwest Geology Field Trips website aren’t listed (yet). Maybe that is your job!

The Washington Glacial Erratics website has re-opened for business. Managed by the undergraduate GeoClub within the Earth and Space Sciences Department at the University of Washington, it is an inventory database and map showing “significant erratics (i.e., large, diameter >8-10 feet , or has a unique composition or features)” in Washington State. Anyone can add their favorite glacial erratics including photos and a description. You will need to know coordinates (UTM or Lat/Long). Visit the website at http://waglacialerratics.ess.washington.edu/ At present (February 9, 2014) there are 12 erratics shown. Get busy!

Dave Tucker

A bit of the mantle: Washington Park, Fidalgo Island, Washington

The 'snake-skin' texture of serpentinite lends its name to 'ophiolite'. This is a nice example near the foot of the stairs.

The ‘snake-skin’ texture of serpentinite lends its name to ‘ophiolite’. This is a nice example near the foot of the stairs.

A geology guide to ultramafic rock at Washington Park, near Anacortes, is now available on Northwest Geology Field Trips. Click here to go straight to the field trip! The rock is the metamorphic rock serpentinite, and was originally in the earth’s mantle below oceanic crust. Exposures are found along the dramatic rocky shore and on bare rocky knobs above the coastal cliffs. A single essential outcrop is highlighted in this quick self-guided field trip. The description explains what ‘ophiolite’ is and points out spectacular glacial polish at the same outcrop.

Coming soon:

  • Mount Erie- Fidalgo ophiolite Part 2
  • Finlayson Point, Victoria
  • Rock Trail, Larrabee State Park
  • ?????

Do you have field trips to share? Please do. Let’s branch out to places in southern and eastern Washington. I’m happy to help you write your guide . Contact me via comment or email:

send email here

send email here

Field guide to Iceberg Point (Lopez Island, San Juans) geology

Quartz veins crosscutting the sheared sandstone at Iceberg Point. As always, click to enlarge the photo.

White quartz veins cross-cut sheared sandstone at Iceberg Point. As always, click to enlarge the photo.

I have at long last published a new geology guide on the Northwest Geology Field Trips website. This one visits Iceberg Point, the beautiful and wild southwest tip of Lopez island out in the San Juans. Your visit to Iceberg Point requires a pleasant nearly-level stroll of around 2 miles (round trip). The geologic guide visits rocks sheared by subduction and accretion and the unconformity between those rocks and the overlying till. Plus, it just a great place for a day trip.

I have been distracted for months (years!) getting Geology Underfoot in Western Washington written and sent off to the editor. I visited more places for the book than I could submit to the publisher, and this is one of the ones I had to omit. It remains a great geo-trip. Wish I could have written more than one volume, but the publishers were having none of that. Sigh. So, I’m going to gradually put some of the ‘deleted’ book vignettes on this website. Thanks to all subscribers to this website; you have apparently been patient during this long hiatus. Don’t go away!

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE ICEBERG POINT GEOLOGY GUIDE

Geology field trip offered near Monroe, Washington

NWGS logo

THIS TRIP IS FULL.

The Northwest Geological Society’s annual fall field trip will visit the Cadman High Rock Quarry near Monroe, Washington. This is a large rock and sand quarry with outstanding exposures of the Volcanic Rocks of Mt. Persis and 107 ka river deposits of the Whidbey Formation with a glacial till below it. We will observe striking evidence of sub-glacial flow and the full range of Vashon glacial units, and look at faults and liquefaction related to the Southern Whidbey Island Fault (SWIF). The field trip will involve walking several miles through the quarry.

Saturday, November 16, 2013
9:45am–3:00 pm
Leader: Bruce Stoker, Earth Systems and High Rock Quarry Personnel
Location: Cadman High Rock Quarry
Address: 19221 High Rock Road, Monroe, WA. 98272

Please RSVP by sending an email to Kathleen.goodman@amec.com.  For important trip information and a trip description, visit the NWGS website:   http://nwgs.org/calendar/NWGS_Fall_2013_FT_Announcement.pdf for details on times, parking, attire, and most important, post-quarry recap at the Grange Cafe in Duvall.  Cost is $10 payable at the quarry.

Advance registration is required for official head count for the quarry. NO WALK-UPS, PLEASE.
Deadline:Thursday, November 14.
Payment: Please bring your $10 payment (cash or check made out to NWGS, no credit or debit cards) to the field
trip for collection at the quarry office.
This is a one-stop field trip. Transportation will not be provided. We will meet at the Cadman High Rock Quarry office (address and a link to directions above).The trip will start with a required 20-minute safety training session in the quarry office. Please do not be late, as the course is required for all to enter the quarry.
The field trip will involve walking several miles through the quarry.

Washington Erratics website temporarily down

Dear friends,

The new Washington Erratics website is temporarily down while a glitch is dealt with. Please do not send in new material until further notice. Anticipated reopening date is November 1. I’ll send out a post when the webmaster there gives me the thumbs up. http://waglacialerratics.ess.washington.edu/

Fragrance Lake addendum: Where quartzite in the till comes from

Broken surface of quartzite.

Broken surface of quartzite.

I’ve been asked about the source for the quartzite clasts in Puget Lowland glacial till. They are diagnostic of a British Columbian provenance for the Puget Lobe of the Vashon advance, and the great glaciations that preceeded that one. Go to the quartzite page, where I discuss the source for these pebbles, and attempt to confuse everyone because there are two kinds of quartzite.