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    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.
    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

    EDUCATORS: Please feel free to use anything you find here that is useful to your mission educating people about Earth science. E-mail me if it would help to have a larger or higher-resolution version of any of the images. tuckerd at geol dot wwu dot edu

Book talk- Geology Underfoot in Western Washington

GUWW cover

Next book presentation by Dave Tucker*:

Camano Island Library

Saturday, April 21: 10:00am – 12:00pm

848 N. Sunrise Blvd., Camano Island, WA 98282

Directions here.

*Yes, alive and well.

Snohomish and Tacoma Geology Underfoot Book talks

A reminder that I will be in Snohomish this Saturday, Feb. 20, and in Tacoma next Thursday, Feb. 25, to talk about Geology Underfoot in Western Washington.

SNOHOMISH Saturday February 20th, 2 PM, Sno-Isle Public Library, 311 Maple Ave., Snohomish, WA

TACOMA Thursday February 25 Kings Book Store, 218 St Helens Ave Tacoma, WA. 7 PM http://www.kingsbookstore.com/event/2016-02

 

Book Presentation in Edmonds September 14

I will be giving a talk about my book, Geology Underfoot in Western Washington on September 14 in Edmonds.

7 PM

Edmonds Senior Center

220 Railroad Ave.

 On the waterfront in Edmonds, directly across the street from the AmTrak station. There is some off-street parking at the Center, and there is elevator access. This is the montly meeting of the Ice Age floods Institute. Free and open to the public.

I will have copies for sale, $24. Also copies of the cover poster, $15. See you there!

Dave

 

Cover art for Geology Underfoot in Western Washington

GUWW cover. Painting by Eric Knight.

Geology Underfoot in Western Washington cover art. Painting by Eric Knight. Click for full size image file.

Geology Underfoot in Western Washington has gone to the printers, and should be on store shelves the end of April or early May. Start bugging you local bookstore to get orders in now. Here’s the book’s cover. It is an oblique view of Mount Rainier during a moderate eruption, made by Eric Knight, and is modeled in part on the 500-year-old Electron lahar. Eric painted the bird’s-eye-view in an arc looking from the north  to the southeast, from the Tacoma Tideflats around to the erupting volcano. There is a lot of detail. Look closely and you will see lahars descending the northwest and western flanks into the Mowich and Puyallup River valleys. The boiling cloud of a pyroclastic flow is on the right, covering the Tahoma Glacier. The lahars coalesce and inundate the Puyallup valley. That’s Lake Kapowsin at lower right. A short distance downstream from the lake, the lahar passes through the center of Orting, which appears seriously damaged and on toward Puyallup and Tacoma. The lahar would likely have a much reduced sediment load by this point, and be more of a hyperconcentrated flow- predominantly extremely muddy water rather than a dense slug of mud. The muddy flow enters Puget Sound at Commencement Bay, having sloshed mud and water all over the Tacoma tideflats industrial area. Suspended sediment has discolored Puget Sound most of the way to Elliot Bay at Seattle. There’s not enough detail in this image to tell, but I-5 appears intact where it crosses the Puyallup. In this hypothetical eruption, no lahar has entered the White River valley so the Auburn-Kent-Duwamish area has been spared.

ERic Knight's art showing a glacier-filled Yosemite Valley on the cover of Geology Underfoot in Yosemite National Park by Allen Glazner and Greg Stock.

ERic Knight’s art showing a glacier-filled Yosemite Valley on the cover of Geology Underfoot in Yosemite National Park by Allen Glazner and Greg Stock.

Erik also did the cover art for Geology Underfoot in Yosemite National Park. He makes wonderful panoramic maps. Visit his website to see a fine panoramic painting of the Salish Sea. It is interactive, so you can zoom in, pan very different perspectives. The tool bar at the bottom includes a ‘help’ button for instructions.

New book: Geology of the San Juan Islands

San Juan Islands geologist Ned Brown brings us a wonderful new geology guide- just in time for holiday gifts.

Ned Brown's Geology of the San Juan Islands. Chuckanut Editions, 2014

Ned Brown’s Geology of the San Juan Islands. Chuckanut Editions, 2014

Geology of the San Juan Islands is a full color guide to the geology of these beautiful islands. The book is written for the geophile of all stripes. It is the best, easiest-to-understand explanation of San Juan geology I have seen, and I urge you to spend $19 and get your own copy right now.

Ned Brown is an emeritus professor in the Western Washington University Geology Department. He has been working in the islands for decades. The complex geology of the archipelago has long inspired and exasperated geologists. Ned’s book describes the remarkable tectonic history that has repeatedly brought together unrelated rocks from around the Pacific and stacked them against each other during subduction. His color photos and detailed diagrams explain the processes and evolution of each of the rock units clearly. The book also explains how he and others have come up with this most current interpretation of San Juan Islands geologic history, by mapping rock units and faults, dating zircon crystals in the rocks, identifying fossils and correlating these with the ancient areas where these creatures lived.  Ned tells you just where to go to see the best outcrops, including all the photo locations. Among the more amazing ideas he throws out is the possible origin of the oldest rocks in the  350- to 500-million year old Turtleback Complex on Orcas Island. The gabbro and granitic rocks, once intruded deep in the crust,  may have originally intruded deep in the crust….in northern Europe! This was during the time of the supercontinent Rodinia.

The book is self-published through the Chuckanut Editions imprint of Village Books in Bellingham. The book is not yet available. Go buy a copy in the store, or write Village Books and ask them to please make the book available for on-line orders.Dave Tucker

 

Geologic tour along the Dallas Road Waterfront Trail, Victoria B.C.

Dark dike of magma invaded a larger body of pale felsic magma. The dike was broken apart. This is at Holland Point. Photo by Glenn Jareshko.

Fascinating geologic relationships can be seen  at Holland Point.

The third geology field trip along the city of Victoria’s shore has been added to the website. This one walks the city’s south shore along the Dallas Road waterfront trail from Clover to Holland Points. The trip description is largely the work of Gerri McEwen, who just completed her undergraduate honors thesis on these rocks at University of Victoria.

The thrust fault has placed older rocks on top of younger rocks.

Southern Vancouver Island thrusting has placed older rocks in the hanging wall over younger rocks in the footwall. These terms are explained in the Dallas Road field trip.

The relationships between these coast rocks are complex. There has been repeated intrusion, faulting,and metamorphism during accretion of an island arc and offshore terranes against Wrangelia after the latter giant terrane had collided with North America. Do you know the meaning of the terms ‘hanging wall’ and ‘foot wall’? Go to the Dallas Road field trip webpage to better understand the origin of these terms.

Some of the rocks are beautiful and well worth the visit. Take your camera!

Geology Underfoot: BOOK SENT TO PUBLISHER!

DT and the Geology Underfoot in Western Washington files. You will get to read it on paper, soemthing I've yet to see.

DT and the Geology Underfoot in Western Washington files- all on one flimsy bit of plastic. You will get to read it on paper, something I’ve yet to see. Chico stands guard my monitor. Photo by Kim Brown.

I finally completed the manuscript of Geology Underfoot in Western Washington. The sum of the last three years of my life was copied onto a DVD and sent off to the publisher today – 423 files including chapter text, photos, diagrams, and maps. There are (at this point) 22 self-guiding field trips, plus a lengthy Introduction that is a primer on plate tectonics, a capsule history of the geologic history of western Washington, a bit about petrology, and how to date a rock (“You need to be a little boulder” says Kim.) Groan. I promise I do not use that pun in the book, but there may be a few other gneiss ones. (Sorry). OK, now my editor James Lainsbury at Mountain Press Publishers gets to hack away. He’ll send it back to me for what I’m sure will be shortening, revisions to some of the figures I made, and who knows what else. The book will be on bookshelves in 2014 unless James says ‘This sucks. Start over.’ Thanks to all the people, geologists and ‘civilians’ alike, who read and field checked the chapters.

You can read a sample chapter (pre-editing) and learn more about the book here on my website.

So, time for a beer. Well, maybe a nap first.

Dave

Guided geology field trip offered: Rafting the Owyhee River in Oregon.

Ouzel Outfitters, a river guiding company in Bend, OR, is working with Dr. Kyle House (USGS) to host a 5-day Geology Rafting Field Trip through the lower Owyhee Canyon in south east Oregon.

The trip dates are April 19-23, 2013.

In the deep canyon, carved in rhyolite and basalt. Photo from Ouzel Outfitters.

According to Brian Sykes, proprietor of Ouzel Outfitters, highlights include hiking, photography, natural hot springs, an isolated river canyon, expert geology interpretation, and petroglyphs. Kyle House said this of the Owyhee: “This is possibly the most consistently amazing place that I have ever been lucky enough to work in. I will keep coming back…”.

The Owyhee canyon and the breached lava dams was the site of this year’s Friends of the Pleistocene field trip. The guide book can be downloaded here: https://sites.google.com/site/owyheefop/home/guidebook     (Bonus: you can also download the FOP songbook! Funny songs!)

I’ve included links below for information about this trip. Ouzel Outfitters provides this description of the geologic features on this trip:

“Between Rome and Birch Creek, Oregon, the Owyhee River passes through an astounding landscape born of a long series of geologic calamities. Among these are a series of massive, valley-choking lava flows; a nearly endless array of valley-flanking landslides; and huge flood-generated boulder bars that record the effects of catastrophic floods, landslide-dam failures and even the overflow of an ice-age lake that once sat in the Alvord Desert at the base of Steens Mountain. Over the last 2 million years, the Owyhee Canyon has been invaded by no less than six valley-filling lava flows. The lavas poured down its tributaries and over its canyon rim creating massive dams. Spectacular examples of the lava dams are abundant along this reach of the river, including towering cliffs of lava 100s of meters high; spectacular lava deltas that record the advance of the lava flows into large lakes of their own creation; and a series of ancient riverbeds below each lava flow that chronicle the Owyhee’s inexorable journey to the bottom of its modern gorge. The Owyhee lava dams were immense, some measuring 10s of kilometers in downstream length. At least some of them blocked the river for up to 20,000 years at a time. Once the Owyhee had filled the lakes with sediment and begun to carve its ultimate path around or through the dams, it generated huge landslides as it impinged on new valley walls, often resulting in landslide dams and short-lived lakes that failed catastrophically and moved huge boulders downstream.”

Camp scene on the Owyhee. Photo from Ouzel Outfitters.

Registration is limited to 14 people.  Kyle House and five river guides will give feel of a small personalized tour of fantastic geology, with one-on-one interaction and in-depth presentation.  If you register before the end of December, Ouzel is offering 2012 pricing.  In this case, the price would be $1029.00.

This page gives the quoted description above, plus a link to photos and a video:

http://www.oregonrafting.com/index.cfm/pid/66/owyhee%20river%20canyon%20geology

This page provides details and reservation information for the field trip:

http://www.oregonrafting.com/index.cfm/pid/23/tripID/32/owyhee/river/rafting/geology/interpretive/educational/kyle/house/eastern/oregon

Rafts on the Owyhee. Photo from Ouzel Outfitters.

An abstract of a paper in the GSA Bulletin describing the lava dams is here:

http://gsabulletin.gsapubs.org/content/early/2012/10/02/B30574.1.abstract

and a geologic map is here: http://owyheeflotsam.posterous.com/

New Missoula flood guidebook published.

On the Trail of the Ice Age Floods: The Northern Reaches, by Bruce Bjornstad and Gene Kiver, is now published. The book directs readers to field sites in the the Channeled Scablands and into northern Idaho to see evidence for the mind-boggling late-Pleistocene Missoula Floods. There are hikes, road trips, and even two aerial field trips.  The book is a sequel to On the Trail of the Ice Age Floods: A geological field guide to the Mid-Columbia Basin by Bruce Bjornstad. A description of the new book is available at the publishers’ website:
It will take a while for the book to be distributed to all the retail outlets but for those wanting it right away, it can be obtained from the Sandpoint Online General Store at: http://www.sandpointonline.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=228

Baker field guide published on line

For those of you who don’t subscribe to the Mount Baker Volcano Research Center website, here’s some news.

A field guide to Mount Baker deposits is available via link from the MBVRC site. The link takes you to a guide written by Dave Tucker and Kevin Scott for a Northwest Geological Society field trip in September, 2010. The guide describes Holocene lavas, lahars, and tephras in the Baker River valley, and the Pleistocene Kulshan caldera and Pinus Lava flow on the northeast flank of Mount Baker.

The trip guide is written by Dave Tucker (WWU) and Kevin Scott (USGS). The two-day trip was held in September 2010. It visited the Baker Lake side on Day 1- Holocene lahars, the Sulphur Creek lava flow, and tephras. Day 2 of the guide visits the volcano’s north east flank: Heather Meadows, the Kulshan caldera, and Pinus Plateau lava. The guide includes maps and color photos.

For a list of NWGS guides, go here.