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  • MOUNT BAKER: Eruptive history, hazards, research.

    Visit Mount Baker Volcano Research Center websites Main website and the blog These are no longer actively maintained but are still good references [DT, April, 2020]
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    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.
    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

    EDUCATORS: Please feel free to use anything you find here that is useful to your mission educating people about Earth science. E-mail me if it would help to have a larger or higher-resolution version of any of the images. tuckerd at geol dot wwu dot edu

Dickerman Mountain geology guide posted

Hi friends! Remember me?

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Stacked lava flows below the summit of  Dickerman Mountain. Click to enlarge.

A new geology field guide has been posted on this website. This one gives you something to do while you huff and puff your way up through the 45-million-year-old Barlow Pass Volcanics on the Dickerman Mountain Trail. The mountain rises above the South Fork Stillaguamish Valley, and is reached by the Mountain Loop Highway east of Verlot and Granite Falls. The trail is a steep mother, gaining 4000′ in just over 4 miles. The summit gives spectacular views into the Monte Cristo area peaks and Glacier Peak. I hiked the trail on July 3, 2016 with my friends Charlie and Scott Linneman. The views weren’t great due to clouds, but I got to examine some North Cascades rocks I wasn’t familiar with. The story is online, here.

Sign up for Geology Field Trip to Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands

May 14th, 8:30-4:30

TRIP IS FULL. THERE IS A WAITING LIST. To get the earliest crack at future trips, please subscribe to MBVRC RSS posts via email- in the margin to the left.

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The view from Mount Erie, once a magma chamber below an oceanic volcano.

Mount Baker Volcano Research Center announces a guided geology field trip. This is a geologic smorgasbord, with stops near Anacortes on Fidalgo Island including ophiolite rock at Washington Park, Mount Erie’s drive-up summit, Rosario Beach and Rosario Head, and Deception Pass. Proceeding to  Whidbey Island we will visit at a minimum West Beach and an ill-sited development on the beach at Swantown.  The trip will be led by Doug McKeever, geology professor (emeritus) at Whatcom Community College, assisted by Dave Tucker, Research Associate with Western Washington University Geology Department and author of Geology Underfoot in Western Washington. Both are board members of MBVRC. COST is $75 per person (prepaid). Proceeds go to the MBVRC research fund.

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Doug McKeever and field trippers examine rock structure.

Van transportation will be provided, and a printed guide describing the most important geologic features of the stops. No hammers, please. Please bring a lunch, beverage (no alcohol please), and shoes and clothing suitable for a short beach walk and for the weather. Trip will “go” rain or shine.

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Glacially polished mantle rock at Washington Park

Credit card: please go to the MBVRC donation page and put $75 in the ‘donation amount’ at the top [please feel free to contribute more, donations are tax deductible]. Make payment to the MBVRC account using our email: research  at  mbvrc.wwu.edu You don’t need a Paypal account to do this.

Check: If you prefer to pay MBVRC directly, please send a check right away to order of MBVRC to 708 13th St, Bellingham, WA 98225. If you choose this option, please reserve via email immediately to research  at   mbvrc.wwu.edu. Will hold your spot as long as we can while your check is in transit.

This is a repeat of a trip we sponsored in spring of 2014. That trip filled very quickly so don’t delay to sign up!

 

Snohomish and Tacoma Geology Underfoot Book talks

A reminder that I will be in Snohomish this Saturday, Feb. 20, and in Tacoma next Thursday, Feb. 25, to talk about Geology Underfoot in Western Washington.

SNOHOMISH Saturday February 20th, 2 PM, Sno-Isle Public Library, 311 Maple Ave., Snohomish, WA

TACOMA Thursday February 25 Kings Book Store, 218 St Helens Ave Tacoma, WA. 7 PM http://www.kingsbookstore.com/event/2016-02

 

Book Presentation in Edmonds September 14

I will be giving a talk about my book, Geology Underfoot in Western Washington on September 14 in Edmonds.

7 PM

Edmonds Senior Center

220 Railroad Ave.

 On the waterfront in Edmonds, directly across the street from the AmTrak station. There is some off-street parking at the Center, and there is elevator access. This is the montly meeting of the Ice Age floods Institute. Free and open to the public.

I will have copies for sale, $24. Also copies of the cover poster, $15. See you there!

Dave

 

New Geology hiking guide published on this website: Ridley Creek Trail, Mount Baker

Link to Ridley Creek Trail geology guide:

https://nwgeology.wordpress.com/the-fieldtrips/ridley-creek-trail-geology-guide/

Foot bridge over the Middle Fork

Foot bridge over the Middle Fork

Ridley Creek Trail begins at the end of the Middle Fork Nooksack Road on the southwest flank of Mount Baker. The trail accesses the heather meadows of Mazama Park and on to Park Butte Lookout. Along the way see forested latest Pleistocene moraines, glacial till from Canada complete with quartzite pebbles from the Rocky Mountains, limestone, lahar and ash deposits, a close up of the Cathedral Crag lava that predates Mount Baker, and finally, great views of Baker, the Black Buttes, and that enigmatic slice of the mantle, the Twin Sisters Range. Read the geology guide here.  Enjoy!

Dave Tucker

Guided geology field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone

The NCI field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone is booked up.

MBVRC WILL OFFER A VERSION OF THIS TRIP LATER IN THE SUMMER. PLEASE STAY TUNED to the MBVRC blog: mbvrc.wordpress.com.

Dave Tucker

Mount Baker Volcano Research Center subscription website

The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge. The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge.

North Cascades Institute is offering a guided geology field trip to the 9500-year-old Schreibers Meadow cinder cone on the south flank of Mount Baker. The trip will be led by MBVRC’s Dave Tucker. The date is July 6th, and costs $95. Register at the NCI website:

http://ncascades.org/signup/programs/volcanoes-legacy-in-cinder-cones-and-crater-lakes

The Schreibers cone is the only one in the Mount Baker volcanic field. It is located in old growth forest at 3500 feet elevation in Schreibers Meadow, just 1/2 mile from the end of the road. The trip will walk a short distance along the Park Butte/Railroad Grade trail, then veer off cross country (huckleberry meadow and some ponds) before the final 130′ climb up a steep forested slope to the crater rim. We’ll walk down to the soggy shores of the two crater lakes, and up to the opposite rim. After…

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Geology of the Rock Trail, Larrabee State Park

Tafoni Wall, striped by tree shadows, is a highlight of the Rock Trail.

Tafoni Wall, striped by tree shadows, is a highlight of the Rock Trail.

I have posted a geology guide to Larrabee State Park’s new Rock Trail. Read the full guide here on the Northwest Geology Field Trips website. The out-and-back hike is just short of 2 miles, and the cliff exposures are perhaps the best in the Chuckanuts. The trail, built by prodigious efforts of over 100 volunteers, was profiled in the Bellingham Herald in February.

 

Red line marks the new Rock Trail. Contour interval is 20'. Note scale in lower left.

Red line marks the new Rock Trail. Contour interval is 20′. Note scale in lower left.

Fidalgo ophiolite field trip, Part II- Mount Erie

Gabbro at Stop 1. Note the pale vertical dikes near the yellow hammer. Click any image to enlarge.

Gabbro at Stop 1. Note the pale vertical dikes near the yellow hammer. Click any image to enlarge.

A self-guided geology field trip to the second part of the Fidalgo ophiolite (oceanic crust section) is posted here. This field trip visits intrusive and sedimentary rocks on Fidalgo Island, including Mount Erie. This is the second installment in the ophiolite series, which started at the chunk of the mantle at Washington Park.

The April 12th guided geology field trip sponsored by Mount Baker Volcano Research Center will visit some of these rocks. Registration information is on the MBVRC website. If you have been waffling, time to be decisive- the trip is nearly full!

The view south from Stop 2 at Mount Erie.

The view south from Stop 2 at Mount Erie. Here we see an island in Lake Campbell, on Fidalgo Island. Skagit Bay stretches off to the south.

Citizen geology- new page added to Northwest Geology Field Trips

This new page directs readers to projects they can participate in, usually as volunteers with a minimum of geologic experience. Go to the Citizen Geology page.

Geologic tour along the Dallas Road Waterfront Trail, Victoria B.C.

Dark dike of magma invaded a larger body of pale felsic magma. The dike was broken apart. This is at Holland Point. Photo by Glenn Jareshko.

Fascinating geologic relationships can be seen  at Holland Point.

The third geology field trip along the city of Victoria’s shore has been added to the website. This one walks the city’s south shore along the Dallas Road waterfront trail from Clover to Holland Points. The trip description is largely the work of Gerri McEwen, who just completed her undergraduate honors thesis on these rocks at University of Victoria.

The thrust fault has placed older rocks on top of younger rocks.

Southern Vancouver Island thrusting has placed older rocks in the hanging wall over younger rocks in the footwall. These terms are explained in the Dallas Road field trip.

The relationships between these coast rocks are complex. There has been repeated intrusion, faulting,and metamorphism during accretion of an island arc and offshore terranes against Wrangelia after the latter giant terrane had collided with North America. Do you know the meaning of the terms ‘hanging wall’ and ‘foot wall’? Go to the Dallas Road field trip webpage to better understand the origin of these terms.

Some of the rocks are beautiful and well worth the visit. Take your camera!