Mount Baker Geology Guide Book by Dave Tucker

Dear friends,

P1020914

Glassy margin of a 300,000-year-old dike along the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail.

I am working on my next book, a road and trail guide to Mount Baker geology. The book focuses on volcanic geology. Most of the road and trail description drafts are done. Now I need VOLUNTEERS before the snow flies to field check distances, descriptions, and get back to me with your comments. It would be helpful if you had a GPS receiver but not essential. To volunteer, leave a comment or email me:  dtchico    at       gmail     dot    com  to request a pdf of one of these:

Middle Fork Nooksack Road and Ridley Creek Trail to Park Butte Lookout

Mount Baker highway to Heather Meadows and Artist Point.

Trails in that area: Bagley Lakes Trail [1.3 mile loop]; Chain Lakes Loop starting in Heather Meadows; Chain Lakes Loop starting at Artist Point; Heather Meadows to Herman Saddle; Ptarmigan Ridge to the end [11.2 miles]; Artist Ridge [to Huntoon Point. 1 mile round trip]; Table Mountain [2.2 miles]; Lake Ann

Glacier Creek Road and the Heliotrope Trail to Survey Rock and the Hogback;

P1020857

Volcanic ash layers along the Chain Lakes loop.

Baker Lake Road [driving trip].

Road to Schreibers Meadow, and the hike to Park Butte.

Rainbow Ridge Trail [unofficial trail]. Also known as Lava Divide.

I am still working on geologic descriptions of the Skyline, Scott Paul and Railroad Grade trails. I have a guide for Cougar Divide but the road is damaged and currently closed.

 

 

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6 Responses

  1. VERY VERY cool On Aug 20, 2016 3:16 PM, “Northwest Geology Field Trips” wrote:

    > magmatist posted: “Dear friends, I am working on my next book, a road and > trail guide to Mount Baker geology. The book focuses on volcanic geology. > Most of the road and trail description drafts are done. Now I need > VOLUNTEERS before the snow flies to field check distance” >

  2. Dave I would love to help you out

  3. […] Source : Mount Baker Geology Guide Book by Dave Tucker […]

  4. I was out at the “Devil’s Rock Garden” east of Big Lake in Skagit County yesterday and was intrigued by the geology. Have you ever been there? It features talus of extraordinary size, much as one sees below Oyster Dome, but no visible source above it. Indeed, the talus field appears to sit in a slight depression or subsidence. How can this be? Can you point me to any info about this site?

    Regards, Eric Bosell

    On Sat, Aug 20, 2016 at 1:15 PM, Northwest Geology Field Trips wrote:

    > magmatist posted: “Dear friends, I am working on my next book, a road and > trail guide to Mount Baker geology. The book focuses on volcanic geology. > Most of the road and trail description drafts are done. Now I need > VOLUNTEERS before the snow flies to field check distance” >

    • Eric, I haven’t seen any solid geologic studies on the Devil’s Garden. However, the best interpretation so far relates the pile of big, angular boulders to an obvious horse-shaped depression on the face of Cultus Mountain 1.75 miles or so to the northeast and upslope. The idea is that a landslide fell onto the surface of the Vashon lobe during the last continental glaciation. The debris was carried only a short distance south before the glacier ceased to advance., When the ice melted, the landslide rocks were dumped on the ground here.

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