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    Northwest Geology Field Trips, by Dave Tucker, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial- Share Alike 3.0 United States License. You can use what you find here, repost it with attribution to the author, "remix" it for your own purposes, but may not use it with the intent of making money off of it.

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200,000 hit milepost reached; New page about uplift.

Migmatite at Diablo Overlook, Highway 20. This is a mix of metamorphic gneiss and intruding igneous dikes. My frien d Klayton for scale, lower left. Photo copyright Dave Tucker

Migmatite at Diablo Overlook, Highway 20. This is a mix of metamorphic gneiss and intruding igneous dikes. My friend Klayton for scale, lower left. Photo copyright Dave Tucker

This website reached 200,000 hits on the afternoon of January 10th. The article on quartzite did it. To celebrate, I dusted off an old draft and have posted it. This one is in the ‘Geology Basics’ section, and is about how rocks deep in the crust are uplifted to reach the surface. It is an excerpt from a chapter in the book, Geology Underfoot in Western Washington that deals with the Skagit Gneiss, which was at one time as much as 18 miles (30 km) deep in the crust. Read it here.

One Response

  1. This is really interesting stuff. All the time I lived in Colorado I never gave much thought to Pikes Peak, other than it being a big mountain, until I read the book you recommended “Along Colorado’s Front Range” and realized Pikes Peak was also uplifted in mass. I’m really looking forward for your book

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