Guided geology field trip to Park Butte, Mount Baker

magmatist:

This guided geology field trip was posted yesterday on teh Mount Baker Volcano Research Center website. The trip is already nearly half full, so don’t delay!

Originally posted on Mount Baker Volcano Research Center subscription website:

Baker and the Black Buttes from the meadows below Park Butte.

Baker and the Black Buttes from the meadows below Park Butte.

MBVRC is offering a guided geology hike to Park Butte, near the south flank of Mount Baker. Registration information is below. The trip is oriented toward the general public with an interest in geology, but no previous geologic background is necessary.

Wednesday, August 20, 8:30 am to 6:00 pm.

The 7-to-8 mile round trip hike offers great views of Mount Baker’s glacier-clad south slope, the glacially-gutted Black Buttes volcano, and  the Twin Sisters range. We will see deposits left by glacier outburst floods, a Mount Baker lahar, the early Holocene Sulphur Creek lava, a rare type of lava for the Baker volcanic center (olivine basalt at Cathedral Crag), several volcanic ash layers, Pleistocene lake deposits, and some of the oldest rock known in the North Cascades (Yellow Aster gneiss in the Bell Pass Melange).  At Tarn Plateau we…

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One space available on Schreibers geology field trip

I am reposting this from the Mount Baker Volcano Research Center website. DO NOT DELAY to sign up!!!

2-day guided geology field trip to the San Juan Islands aboard sailing schooner “Zodiac”.

An Invitation to a geology field trip around the San Juan Islands via boat with John Whitmer, trip leader.
Departure and return:  Monday, June 23 at the Fairhaven dock, Bellingham, WA at 9:00 am,
through Wednesday, June 25 between 3 and 5 pm at the same dock.

·         The boat “Zodiac” is berthed next to the Alaska Ferry terminal in Fairhaven near Bellingham.

·         “Three hots and a cot,” i.e. three meals and a sleeping bunk are included.

·         Cost for the three day trip is $390 per person, a great bargain.

·         Spouses and friends are invited, especially if they have an interest in Northwest geology.

·         The trip can only go if 24 sign up. But sign up quickly – there’s a maximum of 26.

Dr. John Whitmer is a geology instructor at Bellevue Community College, and has taught at a number of other schools. He is a past president of the Northwest Geological Society and member of the Puget Lobe Chapter of Ice Age Floods Institute.

http://gallery.mailchimp.com/fa0b4f1dc42f267466045d4be/images/205e4a78-f120-4d6b-a519-f714f5d730da.png

The Schooner Zodiac.

Itinerary This trip is the fulfillment of a dream, combining luxury with the opportunity

to see WORLD-CLASS GEOLOGY up close. 
The plan is to sail around Orcas & San Juan Islands.  The exact route will be governed by
wind & tidal currents prevailing at that time.  The cruise will provide ample opportunity to
observe the big picture of major anticlines (turtlebacks) in the hanging walls of thrust faults,
together with fine examples of deep marine pillow basalts.  Beach hikes at places such as
Cattle Point & Limekiln on San Juan Island will lead to outcrops showing the mélanges &
deformation related to the faulting.  Stops at places such as Rosario & Roche Harbor will
be of great historical interest.

Aboard Zodiac

Travel to the boat: The “Zodiac” is berthed next to the Alaska Ferry terminal in Fairhaven near Bellingham.

  •          There is Greyhound Bus service and Amtrak train service to the ferry terminal.
  •          Driving directions:

o   Be sure to arrange carpools.

o   Drive north to Bellingham.

o   Take exit 250 and turn left at the stop sign at the end of the off ramp onto

Old Fairhaven Parkway.  After the intersection that turns left to Chuckanut Drive,

turn left at the next stop sign onto Harris Ave.  Drive to the Alaska Ferry terminal.

“Zodiac” is on  the west side of the terminal — just look for the tall masts.

o   Passengers can be dropped off at the gate to the pier.  The cars are parked a

short distance away. The estimated distance from the drop off point to the boat is

about 200 feet.

o   There is parking at the Terminal.

To join the fun, contact Dennis Armstrong at knots@drizzle.com (this is not a link).  Please put “San Juan trip” in the subject line.

Guided geology field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone

magmatist:

The NCI field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone is booked up.

MBVRC WILL OFFER A VERSION OF THIS TRIP LATER IN THE SUMMER. PLEASE STAY TUNED to the MBVRC blog: mbvrc.wordpress.com.

Dave Tucker

Originally posted on Mount Baker Volcano Research Center subscription website:

The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge.

The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge.

North Cascades Institute is offering a guided geology field trip to the 9500-year-old Schreibers Meadow cinder cone on the south flank of Mount Baker. The trip will be led by MBVRC’s Dave Tucker. The date is July 6th, and costs $95. Register at the NCI website:

http://ncascades.org/signup/programs/volcanoes-legacy-in-cinder-cones-and-crater-lakes

The Schreibers cone is the only one in the Mount Baker volcanic field. It is located in old growth forest at 3500 feet elevation in Schreibers Meadow, just 1/2 mile from the end of the road. The trip will walk a short distance along the Park Butte/Railroad Grade trail, then veer off cross country (huckleberry meadow and some ponds) before the final 130′ climb up a steep forested slope to the crater rim. We’ll walk down to the soggy shores of the two crater lakes, and up to the opposite rim. After…

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Geology of the Rock Trail, Larrabee State Park

Tafoni Wall, striped by tree shadows, is a highlight of the Rock Trail.

Tafoni Wall, striped by tree shadows, is a highlight of the Rock Trail.

I have posted a geology guide to Larrabee State Park’s new Rock Trail. Read the full guide here on the Northwest Geology Field Trips website. The out-and-back hike is just short of 2 miles, and the cliff exposures are perhaps the best in the Chuckanuts. The trail, built by prodigious efforts of over 100 volunteers, was profiled in the Bellingham Herald in February.

 

Red line marks the new Rock Trail. Contour interval is 20'. Note scale in lower left.

Red line marks the new Rock Trail. Contour interval is 20′. Note scale in lower left.

Calling citizen scientists: Cascade snow survey

Susan Dickerson-Lange (WWU alum) is working toward a PhD at the University of Washington involving snow hydrology and would like your help. Read below.

_____________________________________

Are you planning any mountain adventures this spring and summer?  We are looking for help from outdoor enthusiasts to collect snow observations as the snowpack melts across the Pacific Northwest.

We need on-the-ground observations of snow presence in forested and open areas, and are looking for hikers, skiers, snowmobilers, and mountaineers to contribute.

Simply take geotagged photos of snow (or no snow) in adjacent forested and open areas and send them to:

uwsnowresearch@gmail.com

…or submit written observations via an online or paper form.

For information, including about geotagging, and a short training video:

http://depts.washington.edu/mtnhydr/research/citsci.shtml

Please spread the word, and contact me if you have any questions or ideas!

thanks,

Susan

____________________________________

Susan Dickerson-Lange

Mobile:  (253) 225-9909

Twitter:  @SDickersonLange

Ph.D. Student, University of Washington

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Mountain Hydrology Lab

http://students.washington.edu/dickers/

Stillaguamish is flowing again.

Dan McShane has been keeping an eye on the river gage on the Stilliguamish below the landslide. His latest post shows that the river is no longer backing up behind the landslide dam. Dan includes a graph from the river gage. I’ve copied his screen capture below- click to enlarge. You can see that discharge [= flow measured in cubic feet per second] dropped instantaneously just after noon on 3/22, from 2000 cfs to 900, and continued to decline down to 700 cfs until Sunday at around 3 PM.  Then the level of the impounded river had risen enough to begin overtopping the low point on the slide surface and began to flow downstream again. The last data point on the graph is from Monday at about 6 PM, and flow seems to have stabilized. You can track the discharge yourself at the gage website.

Stilliguamish gage data. Click to enlarge.

Stilliguamish gage data. Click to enlarge.

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