Guided geology field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone

magmatist:

The NCI field trip to Schreibers Meadow cinder cone is booked up.

MBVRC WILL OFFER A VERSION OF THIS TRIP LATER IN THE SUMMER. PLEASE STAY TUNED to the MBVRC blog: mbvrc.wordpress.com.

Dave Tucker

Originally posted on Mount Baker Volcano Research Center subscription website:

The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge.

The bushwack up to the cinder cone rim. Click to enlarge.

North Cascades Institute is offering a guided geology field trip to the 9500-year-old Schreibers Meadow cinder cone on the south flank of Mount Baker. The trip will be led by MBVRC’s Dave Tucker. The date is July 6th, and costs $95. Register at the NCI website:

http://ncascades.org/signup/programs/volcanoes-legacy-in-cinder-cones-and-crater-lakes

The Schreibers cone is the only one in the Mount Baker volcanic field. It is located in old growth forest at 3500 feet elevation in Schreibers Meadow, just 1/2 mile from the end of the road. The trip will walk a short distance along the Park Butte/Railroad Grade trail, then veer off cross country (huckleberry meadow and some ponds) before the final 130′ climb up a steep forested slope to the crater rim. We’ll walk down to the soggy shores of the two crater lakes, and up to the opposite rim. After…

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Cascades Volcano Presentation in Bellingham, October 29

John Ewert

Dr. John Ewert

Guest speaker: John Ewert, Scientist-in-charge- of the Cascade Volcano Observatory, US Geological Survey, Vancouver, WA.

Whatcom Museum, October 29. Doors at 6:30, presentation at 7. Free, but please consider a $3 donation to the museum at the door.

The talk, sponsored by the Mount Baker Volcano Research Center, will focus on the current status of volcano monitoring and research throughout the Cascades. At CVO John oversees all research on the Cascade volcanos, and is  an authority on volcano monitoring. He has worked all over the world.

“We have a lot of volcanoes in the United States — 170 of them. … And since 1980 there have been something like 100 eruptions from 35 or so of them. So, volcanically, we’re pretty busy,” he said. “And in the Cascades we have 13 large volcanoes and a lot of smaller ones…you just never know when these volcanoes are going to switch on and move toward eruption.”

Multi-gas sampler, Sherman Crater, Mount Baker.

Multi-gas sampler, Sherman Crater, Mount Baker.

“And once you start getting earthquakes or see something happening at the surface, you’re already behind the curve if you haven’t been watching to see what is normal and what the baseline is,” Ewert said. “So if you’re coming to the game late, you never know how long the fuse is.”

A number of presentations about Mount Baker eruption history and hazards will be presented by MBVRC.

Kendall Elementary School, October 25.

La Connor Museum, November 2

Bellingham, Bloedel Donovan Park, November 18.

For details, visit the MBVRC website: http://mbvrc.wordpress.com/field-trips/

Middle Fork Nooksack debris flows- another one, and an update

The Middle Fork has cut 10 m through the May 31 debris flow. Click to enlarge.

The Middle Fork has cut 10 m through the May 31 debris flow. Click to enlarge.

There is a description of ongoing dramatic changes to the new debris flow deposits in the Middle Fork Nooksack over on the MBVRC blog. There has been a second debris flow, on June 6th.

Debris flow update: http://mbvrc.wordpress.com/2013/06/12/more-debris-flows-in-middle-fork/

Comparative YouTube videos. June 9th  video shows major changes in only four days: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cepN93zOY8

Compare with the June 5th YouTube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vVJPPwLgwM

More on Middle Fork Nooksack debris flow

By Dave Tucker  June 7, 2013

Photo by John Scurlock. Explanation on the link to today's MBVRC blog post.

Photo by John Scurlock. Explanation on the link to today’s MBVRC blog post.

The source of the debris flow in the Middle Fork Nooksack River is now believed to be a large landslide rather than a glacial outburst flood. This is based on new aerial photos provided by John Scurlock and Steph Abegg. The updated post is on the MBVRC blog.

There is video I made when I visited the deposits two days ago. See it here on YouTube. Shows the extent of the debris flow deposit at the Ridley Creek ford.

And another YouTube video shows a volcanic debris flow [a.k.a. 'lahar'] raging down a valley in Indonesia. It is probably similar to the Middle Fork flow, except considerably smaller.

There will be another visit to the deposit Sunday AM early by a geologic team to begin serious study of the deposits and to try to begin estimating volume, velocity and other parameters of the May 31 debris flow. There will probably be an update posted on the MBVRC blog, so if you don’t already subscribe to it, consider doing so.

Glacial Outburst Flood in Middle Fork Nooksack- May 31, 2013

NEWS ITEM

The 'hihg-mud mark' from the glacial outburst flood and debris flow is 20 feet above Bob's head. Click to enlarge.

The ‘high-mud mark’ from the glacial outburst flood and debris flow is 20 feet above Bob’s head. Click to enlarge.

A large flood of sediment and water swept the upper channel of the Middle Fork Nooksack River early in the morning of Friday, May 31. Boulders up to 10′ across were pitched onto a terrace 15′ above water level, and the river channel was buried in mud. A seismometer on Mount Baker picked up the tremor of the debris flow, and the sudden increase in river volume was detected on the stream gage at Nugent’s Corner, 25 miles away, a couple of hours later. The river is still very turbid. A report with photos is posted on the Mount Baker Volcano Research Center blog:

http://mbvrc.wordpress.com/2013/06/05/large-debris-flow-in-middle-fork-nooksack-river-may-31-2013/

 

Guided geology field trip by Dave Tucker: Baker River trail June 8th

Dear friends,

An alluvial fan is perfectly exposed in cross section along the Baker River trail.

An alluvial fan is perfectly exposed in cross-section along the Baker River trail.

Mount Baker Volcano Research Center is offering a field trip up the Baker River on June 8th. It is a fundraiser for the non-profit, and I’ll be leading it, along with Doug McKeever (Whatcom Community College) and Sue Madsen (Skagit Fisheries Enhancement).

Highlights include:

  • Shuksan greenschist (metamorphosed subducted seafloor basalt) which is the local bedrock;
  • new salmon restoration facilities;
  • an active alluvial fan;
  • river erosion and deposition;
  • a great variety of rocks in river bars;
  • rock slides;
  • a fantastic ‘faerie forest’ of lichen-draped maples.
  • If the weather be good- fabulous views into the heart of the North Cascades.

Cost is $75, includes van transport and a trip guide.

For info and registration, go to:

http://mbvrc.wordpress.com/2013/05/08/mbvrc-geology-field-trip-june-8th-geo-potpourri-plus-salmon-ecology/

An unnamed waterfall plummets hundreds of feet over a wall of metamorphic bedrock along the trail. Click to enlarge any photo.

An unnamed waterfall plummets hundreds of feet over a wall of metamorphic bedrock along the trail. Click to enlarge any photo.

Mount Baker eruption history and hazard presentation schedule: Mount Vernon, Concrete, Anacortes

Three presentations about Mount Baker eruptive history and hazards are scheduled for this spring.

March 7: MOUNT VERNON Skagit Valley College, Phillip Tarro Theatre. Doors 6:30, talk 7 PM. Sponsored by SVC Veterans Club and Center for Learning & Teaching. This is a repeat of the january 31 event, which drew far too many people to get in the doors. GET THERE EARLY.

March 21: CONCRETE at the Concrete Theatre. 7PM. Fundraising event for MBVRC, Concrete High School Band, and KSVU Radio. There will probably be an admission charge at the door- stay tuned via your subscription to this website or the MBVRC blog www.mbvrc.wordspress.com.

April 27: ANACORTES. Fidalgo Bay Resort. One of several presentations at the Fidalgo Bay Academy. Sponsored by Skagit Beach Watchers. Pre-registration to the Academy will be required, watch here for details.

As usual, the MBVRC t-shirts will be available for purchase, $20.

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